1. 23:26 7th Aug 2014

    Notes: 3002

    Reblogged from spx

    image: Download

    siminiblocker:

aarnimation:

mrjakeparker:

An open call to action to ALL artists everywhere! 
Announcing WORLD ART DROP DAY on September 2nd
All artists, (that means students and professionals, painters and cartoonists, sculptors and illustrators, animators and fine artists, EVERYONE who creates) this September 2nd is World Art Drop Day. Wherever you find yourself that day, drop a piece of your art and tell someone where to find it. The world needs this right now. We need to feel a little more connection to each other and there’s nothing like the bond two random strangers can make through the act of creating and giving.
I recently just finished a cross-country art drop this summer and it was exhilarating. The emails and responses I received from the finders ran the gamut of funny to touching. I want that for everyone!
Here’s how it works:
Draw a picture and hide it somewhere.
Take a photo of either the art or the hiding spot or a combination of both.
Post the image, the city you dropped it in, and a hint on any social media of your choice. Be sure to included the hashtag: #artdropday
Then move on, hoping someone finds it. OR hang around and meet your new friend.
That’s it!
I need your help spreading the word on this. Reblog it, retweet it, facebook it, or even tell someone in person!
September 2nd, lets connect the whole planet with art!

YES!

Art holidays!

    siminiblocker:

    aarnimation:

    mrjakeparker:

    An open call to action to ALL artists everywhere! 

    Announcing WORLD ART DROP DAY on September 2nd

    All artists, (that means students and professionals, painters and cartoonists, sculptors and illustrators, animators and fine artists, EVERYONE who creates) this September 2nd is World Art Drop Day. Wherever you find yourself that day, drop a piece of your art and tell someone where to find it. The world needs this right now. We need to feel a little more connection to each other and there’s nothing like the bond two random strangers can make through the act of creating and giving.

    I recently just finished a cross-country art drop this summer and it was exhilarating. The emails and responses I received from the finders ran the gamut of funny to touching. I want that for everyone!

    Here’s how it works:

    • Draw a picture and hide it somewhere.
    • Take a photo of either the art or the hiding spot or a combination of both.
    • Post the image, the city you dropped it in, and a hint on any social media of your choice. Be sure to included the hashtag: #artdropday
    • Then move on, hoping someone finds it. OR hang around and meet your new friend.

    That’s it!

    I need your help spreading the word on this. Reblog it, retweet it, facebook it, or even tell someone in person!

    September 2nd, lets connect the whole planet with art!

    YES!

    Art holidays!

     
  2. image: Download

    I’m finishing up my entry for the TJ and Amal fanbook that’s being made in tribute to an amazing webcomic that recently completed its run.
Hopefully I’ll get this finished up after work; all I need to do is scan in a watercolor wash and get some lettering in and it’ll be good to go. I tried to faithfully capture TJ’s Muppet-like quality in this piece.

    I’m finishing up my entry for the TJ and Amal fanbook that’s being made in tribute to an amazing webcomic that recently completed its run.

    Hopefully I’ll get this finished up after work; all I need to do is scan in a watercolor wash and get some lettering in and it’ll be good to go. I tried to faithfully capture TJ’s Muppet-like quality in this piece.

     
  3. 18:57 16th Jul 2014

    Notes: 1095

    Reblogged from jollityfarm

    Tags: referencecomicsinspiration

    Anonymous said: How did you motivate yourself to start your comic? I'm trying to start a comic right now, but I keep worrying about dumb things like art thieves and people who in general won't like it. How did you get past these things and begin?

    lackadaisycats:

    Well, nothing ventured, nothing gained, right? 

    Theft and haters should probably be the least of your worries at this stage, honestly. Focus your energy on telling a good story, developing an artistic approach that complements the story, communicating effectively with your dialogue and your page layouts, working out a production schedule, and just hunkering down and doing the work (which will probably amount to more blood, sweat and tears than you can prepare for, assuming you haven’t done this before). Those are the things that are really worth troubling yourself over because that’s ultimately how the undertaking becomes fulfilling…they’re the satisfying meaty bits of a creative diet…the marrow even…
    …the colorful, delightsome dehydrated marshmallows in the soggy, beige compost of your breakfast cereal…not altogether unlike Life cereal, but not exactly Life, which is a shame because that would really drive this metaphor home…like the Kool Aid man through your living room wall…
    (Help me)

    There will be people who won’t like your comic. It’s not hard to distinguish thoughtful criticism from ridicule and resentment, though. Filter out the former and sift through it for useful information. As to the latter, well, electronic outrage from anonymous assholes is rather a fact of life in this day and age, isn’t it? No matter who you are, what you do, what your art looks like, how you write, or what you choose to write about, there are going to be people out there who’ll glean some perverse satisfaction from telling you how much they hate it. You can’t spend your life hiding away from inevitable nonsense like that, though, and trying to tiptoe around it by making everyone happy is limiting, sterilizing, and equally futile. Come to grips with the existence of the vitriol, know that along the way at least a little of it will pelt you in the face, and though it will quite probably sting, understand that it’s often more about the individual it’s coming from and their personal issues than it is about your work…then move along because other things are more important. Do the comic for your own gratification foremost. Do it how you want to do it. Do it genuinely for your love of the art, the process, the story, the characters. When you love it, it’ll sustain your interest and will demand to be done with integrity. The quality of your output will reflect that - work really shines when you’ve loved it so much it could kill you - and the quality of the feedback you get will tend to coincide.

    Art thievery is a pain in the ass, to be sure, and while it can make you feel like crumpling into a heap, lashing out, setting the internet on fire, becoming a cave hermit on impulse, crying and rage-vomiting all at the same time, incidents are fairly uncommon. When they do happen, they’re usually minor and the internal melodrama is quickly replaced with resolve to continue along and address the problem as best you can. Someone reposting something you made and taking credit for it, slapping your art on a set of table coasters and putting it up for sale in an Etsy store, compiling it with a bunch of other things into a slipshod publication or app - these things happen, they’re vexing, but they aren’t career-ending catastrophes and they’re usually not particularly detrimental to anything but your pride. For rarer but more heinous situations involving revenues and corporations that should know better, the art community at large is usually quick to come to the outspoken defense and aid of artists who have clearly been wronged. You can take sensible precautions as well, like including your copyright information on everything and registering trademarks if you’re making a business of your art.

    Yes, conceivably something terrible and personally devastating could happen, but you have to weigh for yourself whether all the good that can come of putting your work out there - the people you’ll share something with, the friends you’ll make, the connections you’ll establish with other artists, the things you stand to learn, the freelance and job opportunities you’ll create for yourself - is worth the risk. I’ve had my share of art theft headaches and heartaches, but if I had to make the choice again, I wouldn’t flinch in decision to share my work online. It has made all the difference in my life and career as an artist, as it has for many others.

    Well, that was a lot of words.  Sorry. I hope it contains something useful. Good luck with your comic!

     
  4. sutherlandart:

I kept seeing that palette meme going around, but wasn’t particularly fond of all the super-high-saturation or low-value ranges. For anyone that wants to try something a little different, here you go.
Have fun, everyone!

I want to push my coloring a little more. Give me a character and a palette number and I’ll have at it!

    sutherlandart:

    I kept seeing that palette meme going around, but wasn’t particularly fond of all the super-high-saturation or low-value ranges. For anyone that wants to try something a little different, here you go.

    Have fun, everyone!

    I want to push my coloring a little more. Give me a character and a palette number and I’ll have at it!

     
  5. 10:36

    Notes: 22991

    Reblogged from bigbigtruck

    Tags: meme

    what is the most noticeable thing of my art style?

    (Source: accursedasche)

     
  6. 13:17 15th Jun 2014

    Notes: 122

    Reblogged from hassavocado

    Tags: writing

    The problem with escapism is that when you read or write a book society is in the chair with you. You can’t escape your history or your culture. So the idea that because fantasy books aren’t about the real world they therefore “escape” is ridiculous. Fantasy is still written and read through the filters of social reality. That’s why some fantasies (like Jonathan Swift’s Gulliver’s Travels) are so directly allegorical—but even the most surreal and bizarre fantasy can’t help but reverberate around the reader’s awareness of their own reality, even if in a confusing and unclear way.
    — China Miéville as interviewed by John Newsinger in ”Fantasy and revolution" for International Socialism, 2000. (via aintgotnoladytronblues)
     
  7. image: Download

    Facial studies for a caricature I want to do. A cartoon based on a live action character based on a cartoon.

    Facial studies for a caricature I want to do. A cartoon based on a live action character based on a cartoon.

     
  8. image: Download

    More refinements on the cast!

    More refinements on the cast!

     
  9. image: Download

    Action poses! Expressions! Still trying to figure out this character’s personality.

    Action poses! Expressions! Still trying to figure out this character’s personality.

     
  10. aghoststorycomic:

    A GHOST STORY HAS UPDATED!! GUEST COMIC PROVIDED BY INCREDIBLY FRIEND KATE!! CHECK OUT HER ART AT http://ksantillus.com/

    TODAY’S UPDATE:  HERE

    START FROM THE TOP: HERE

    SUPPORT A GHOST STORY ON PATREON

    This is the guest comic I made for my awesome friend Bea! Check out the rest of A Ghost Story if you’re into dark comedy with a paranormal twist!

     
  11. mortalityplays:

    amphiaria:

    mortalityplays:

    amphiaria:

    mirifact: a lot of those ~essential character building memes~ are fun but I don’t think a lot of that shit is actually necessary. seriously, when you lay down a question like “what is your character’s favorite food” a voice in my head goes “um objection, does clarification of this character’s favorite food serve the overarching narrative in any way”

    characters are fun, but characters primarily serve the narrative, and the narrative is the most important part

    I’m actually of the opinion that those meme things do more harm than good for a lot of younger / less experienced writers because they impress the idea that ‘you MUST know this!!’ when in fact most of that shit is meandering irrelevance that can only possibly distract from the thematic role of that character in a surrounding work. A lot of those questions are things that you discover about a character as you actively write them, which tons of people never get around to doing because they’re too busy trying to design a tertiary character’s favourite childhood toy.

    but ~~worldbuilding~~ rosa!!

    WHY YES THANK YOU FOR BRINGING THAT UP *clears throat, stacks notes*

    The word ‘worldbuilding’ needs to be struck out of our creative vocabularies because it puts misleading emphasis on the creation of setting over the effect of setting on narrative. Like many things endemic to the stiff shitty masturbatory genre that modern fantasy has become, I blame Tolkien for this. One dude published all his cultural notes and lore and linguistic detail, and a thousand nerds got it into their heads that all of that is necessary to writing a compelling setting.

    (In fact, I’d argue, the reason middle earth and all its inhabitants were compelling is that Tolkien did an extremely good job of repackaging existing folklores into one cohesive world — readers were already subconsciously very familiar with most of the archetypes and storytelling conceits that creatures like orcs and elves and ents drew from. But that’s a whole other tangent.)

    Understanding your setting as a writer is extremely important, consistency in major recurring points of setting is extremely important, internal logic is extremely important. What’s really really really not important is that your setting could theoretically exist in real life with all the gaps filled in because you know what the weather is like on the other side of the globe from where the main action takes place. The job of a storyteller is to provide enough good and textured detail that their audience can fill in the gaps themselves without A) hitting a logical contradiction or B) undermining the messages you intend to convey. When you start filling you own head with irrelevant white noise, it’s very easy to ‘lose the signal’ that was your story’s initial intent. Which isn’t to say that you can’t develop and know all of those details, just that they’re not necessary and you should be wary of compromising your abilities as a storyteller by focusing on them too much.

    The word ‘worldbuilding’ pisses me off, because as writers we are not in the business of building worlds. We’re in the business of building settings. If your play takes place in a single room, you don’t build an entire house around the stage. The audience aren’t going to see it. It’s a waste of time and money and effort that you could be putting into everything they will see. If you start to think of your setting as a ‘world’, then you’ve detached it from the limitations of space and time which make a plot. It’s a bad habit, and one that we should really try to break before we propagate it much further. And yeah, I am a hypocrite. I very often use the words ‘world’ and ‘worldbuilding’ in place of setting myself, because they’ve become an easy part of the vocabulary of the particularly open community of writers that exist on the internet. I still think they’re bad, though, and I still think we should watch out for that creeping attitude in our work. 

    There are eight million apartments in the naked city, but your story really only demands that you develop one.

     
  12. 17:42 28th May 2014

    Notes: 10662

    Reblogged from shatterlands

    Tags: resourcesbusinessfreelance

    ricardobessa:

    juliedillon:

    wannabeanimator:

    Art Business Bootcamp 1: Getting You Found

    This is pretty much the exact advice I give to people. 

    Also: to find different art directors and publishers and studios if you don’t already have some in mind, look at the client lists of artists who are working in the field you want to work in. :) 

    Extra tip: if you speak any languages besides English, your pool of possible commissioners just got bigger. Research the market in countries other than US if you’re able to (you can probably contact these people in English anyway, but researching their contact details might prove difficult).

    (I don’t usually post this stuff on this blog, but this seemed like a good time to make an exception)